Skip to main content

Website Helps Residents Buy $1 Vacant Lots

By: Patrick Barry
Published: April 4, 2014

It was big news in Greater Englewood in March when the City of Chicago announced that it would begin a pilot Large Lot Program that allowed nearby homeowners, block clubs and nonprofit groups to buy vacant lots for just $1. 

But the application deadline is April 21 and there are a lot of steps in the process, from identifying the available lots to establishing eligibility and then filing the application.

Now there's an app for that.

It's a website, actually, a step-by-step guide to the whole process. LargeLots.org  was conceived by Demond Drummer at Teamwork Englewood, built "in a few days" by the civic tech programming firm DataMade (thanks to Derek Eder, Forest Gregg and Eric van Zanten!), and funded by LISC Chicago with support from the Boeing Corporation.

The project is an outgrowth of LISC's Open Gov for the Rest of Us project, a Knight Foundation-supported effort to help neighborhoods apply government information to local needs. The LargeLots map was built using open data from Chicago and Cook County, including Chicago - City Owned Land InventoryChicago - Wards, and Cook County - 2012 Parcels.

See the April 15 presentation about largelots.org at the OpenGov Hack Night.

How LargeLots.org became a reality, on Chicago Public Data. Demond Drummer and Aysha Butler were interviewed on WBEZ's Tech Shift.

Read the Columbia Chronicles storyLocal hackers raise awareness through community-focused websites.

Large Lots was featured on ABC7 News on April 9:

Learn more at largelots.org, on the Teamwork Englewood website, and on the Metropolitan Planning Council blog.

Posted in Areas of Work, Neighborhoods

Stay connected

Stay up to date with the the latest news and events related to LISC Chicago.
»

STAY CONNECTED

Stay up to date with the the latest news and events related to LISC Chicago.

Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Flickr
Instagram

About LISC Chicago

Local Initiatives Support Corporation Chicago connects neighborhoods to the resources they need to become stronger and healthier.

More about LISC Chicago »
Contact our staff »